Posts Tagged ‘money’

Money Can Get in The Way of a Good Opportunity

Sunday, May 15th, 2016

As a business owner and employer I’ve learned a few things about the hold that money has on people.

I’ve learned that good money isn’t necessarily synonymous with a good opportunity.

In fact money may keep you locked in golden handcuffs preventing you from a great opportunity.

I’ve learned that for many people the joy of learning is dependent on the amount of money that’s in it.

If the money isn’t enough; the learning becomes less than joyful.

If the money isn’t enough more people will leave a good opportunity for a lesser opportunity just because they can make more money quicker.

Many people will choose misery in a job they hate if the money payoff is high enough.

The amount of money a person makes has more to do with how they feel about themselves than just about anything else.

A person may say that money isn’t everything but when it comes right down to it for many–it’s pretty darn close.

It takes guts to walk away from money.

It takes guts to walk toward opportunity.

It takes guts to walk toward opportunity when the payoff is unknown.

It takes guts to love what you do even though the initial payoff is low.

Peace of mind comes to those who love what they do for the pure joy of it despite the money they get for the work they do.

It takes maturity to know that the more you do something you love the less desire there is to find work that provides a better payoff.

Some of the happiest people I’ve ever met are the ones who have chosen to live with less in the way of things while being bountiful in the way of joy.

It takes wisdom to understand that opportunity trumps money every single time.

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Money Ears

Thursday, February 19th, 2015

When money talks money ears listen but how long can anyone listen to

what money has to say?

The sweetest words don’t come from hearing money talk.

The sweetest words come from listening to the heart of a voice that wants

nothing in return but your time attention and love.

No Contact

 

Money Gets in the Way of Opportunity

Tuesday, August 26th, 2014

As a business owner & employer I’ve learned a few things about the hold that money has on people.

I’ve learned that good money isn’t necessarily synonymous with a good opportunity.

In fact money may keep you locked in golden handcuffs preventing you from a great opportunity.

I’ve learned that for many people the joy of learning is dependent on the amount of money that’s in it.

If the money isn’t enough; the learning becomes less than joyful.

If the money isn’t enough more people will leave a good opportunity for a lesser opportunity just because they can make more money quicker.

Many people will choose misery in a job they hate if the money payoff is high enough.

The amount of money a person makes has more to do with how they feel about themselves than just about anything else.

A person may say that money isn’t everything but when it comes right down to it for many–it’s pretty darn close.

It takes guts to walk away from money.

It takes guts to walk toward opportunity.

It takes guts to walk toward opportunity when the payoff is unknown.

It takes guts to love what you do even though the initial payoff is low.

Peace of mind comes to those who love what they do for the pure joy of it despite the money they get for the work they do.

It takes maturity to know that the more you do something you love the less desire there is to find work that provides a better payoff.

Some of the happiest people I’ve ever met are the ones who have chosen to live with less in the way of things while being bountiful in the way of joy.

It takes wisdom to understand that opportunity trumps money every single time.

No Contact

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tandas Help Latinas Invest

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

Have you heard of tandas?

This is a very unique way of investing money into a circle of friends, family, or co-workers.

Please read:

http://n.pr/Pe2j1k

No Contact

 

The Fear of the Loss of Money

Sunday, December 23rd, 2012

The fear of the loss of money can be quite the handicapping condition.

There are things people do and keep doing in order to have a steady stream of it. I spent years chained to situations that were not right for me because I believed I wouldn’t have money.

I learned that by exploring, researching, studying, being patient, and then bracing myself for the transition, I could break away from these situations.

Traveling through rough transitional waters is part of any journey. It’s not easy and there are challenges but the reward has been the ability to breath easier with a level of peace in my life I had forgotten existed.

 

Do Something You Love

Thursday, June 21st, 2012

You can only become truly accomplished at something you love. Don’t make money your goal. Instead, pursue the things you love doing, and then do them so well people can’t take their eyes off you.        Maya Angelou

Crisis Center in Need of Funds for Repairs

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012

http://bit.ly/IpJX3M

Too Much Work Can Cost You

Monday, April 2nd, 2012

Life revolves around work and money.

Not that money and work isn’t important.  Money of course is our primary means of exchange for goods and services. Work is how we get the money.

However earning a living is a small part of life and over the last few years this realization has really hit home for me.

Recently I had the opportunity to learn from a wise client who has paid a heavy price. So much of what I know I learn from the clients I serve–people who are seriously ill, disabled or elderly. For the past nine years they have been my teachers.

I met with this client in her home. She told me how much she used to love to work. In fact she loved working so much she often took on more than her share.

She was in an investigative field and there were many cases she worked on that required travel out of the area. At the time she held her job she was single and many of her co-workers had young families. When an assignment came up that was out of the area and a co-worker had a family obligation my client would regularly volunteer to take on these assignments.

Although she enjoyed the work and didn’t mind doing the extra traveling she grew tired. Over time the long and extended hours took a toll on her.

She told me how she pushed herself to keep going and going and going until one day her body simply stopped. That morning it took everything she had to get out of bed. She made it into work but her co-workers noticed something was different. They told her she didn’t look well and should go home.

Managers also noticed and told her she was going home.

So she did and shortly afterward she had her first stroke. That was over twenty years ago and she hasn’t been back to work since.

She talked about how over the years it has been so painful to see other people go to work. She often looked out her window watching them leave to go to their jobs. She wanted so much to do the same but couldn’t.

She gave me the analogy of a broken mirror. How you can take the broken pieces and put them back together but no matter how hard you try the mirror will never be the same.

She said it’s the same with people. Once a piece of us breaks we can try to get back to the way we used to be but often the damage is irreparable and we’ll never get back to where we were.

She said it doesn’t matter what type of work a person does if they push too hard and pile too much on it will take them down one way or another.

We can love our work and the money it provides for us but our work and the money we receive is not our whole life.

Our health is precious.

So the lesson I learned from my teacher was do good work and enjoy it but know when to turn out the light and call it a day.

The extra $$ isn’t worth it.

Life is out there and meant to be lived.

We only get one life and one body.

Treat it right.

 

Risking–Is What You Want Worth It?

Monday, March 26th, 2012

I was visiting with a friend yesterday.

She is in the middle of some life transitions and asked me for some advice.

She feels like I’ve been through a few of my own so decided to run some ideas by me. She’s the first to admit that she’s risk averse so change is never going to be taken lightly by her especially when risk is involved.

I let her know I thought it was a little surprising she would ask for my advice because I do take risks.

But I also let her know that risk doesn’t come easy for me. In fact taking risks scares me a lot! I consider myself a scaredy cat when it comes to risk taking but usually go ahead and do whatever it is anyway. I don’t throw caution to the wind and just go for it–I do my research but in the end I usually feel I’m best off if I go forward with my plan.

There is never 100% assurance that taking the plunge will be right but as opportunities open up I think it’s up to each of us to evaluate the ones put before us and take a chance with those that seem promising.

However there is a catch.

If we take a risk we’ve got to be prepared for a negative or positive outcome. There are no guarantees.

So by the end of our visit she seemed to feel pretty good about her plan. She has to save some money to make it happen but within six months feels she’ll be able to take the next step.

How do  you feel about risk?

Is what you want worth the risk?

 

 

 

Domestic Violence Isn’t Always Physical

Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

Domestic Violence isn’t always physical. In some relationships one partner, often the male, doesn’t use physical violence but rather controls virtually every aspect of the relationship–the money and how it is spent, power, social contact–how much and who it’s with. They constantly criticize, have temper tantrums, and play mind games.  Please read:  http://bit.ly/AqVvQa