Posts Tagged ‘abuse survivors’

Ending a Destructive Relationship

Monday, May 6th, 2013

Ten years ago I accepted an invitation to dinner with a man I was dating at the time. It was a warm Spring evening and he came to pick me up on his motorcycle. Once he got to my house, it didn’t take me long to realize he’d been drinking as I could smell it on his breath. Never-the-less,  I decided to get on the back of the bike and also chose to leave without two items I almost always take with me–my purse and phone.

Once we got to the restaurant and sat down he ordered drinks. I got a familiar sinking feeling in the pit of my stomach but chose to ignore it opting instead to go with the flow which was standard for me in this particular relationship.  After downing several beers he became obnoxiously loud and  rude with the waitperson who was serving us so was escorted out the door. I got up and walked out behind them. There were many thoughts spinning around in my head not the least of which was frustration with the fact that I was dealing with this situation at all.

Once outside the restaurant he went to get his bike and although I was used to going with the flow, I knew there was no way I would this time.

He pulled up to where I stood expecting me to hop on but I told him no. Agitated, he  said “get on the bike now!” And again I affirmed I wasn’t going to.  After a few more go-rounds of his insistence and my refusal he left. And there I stood no purse, no money, no phone and no ride home. I’m not sure why, but I elected not to go back in the restaurant to make a phone call maybe because I was too embarrassed or maybe because I just wanted to be alone. Whatever the reason, I started walking home–all twelve miles. (more…)

Take More Time to Pay Attention in Conversations with Others

Friday, February 8th, 2013

If we take more time to pay attention to our thoughts when in conversations with others we’re less likely to have conversations with abusers and in turn develop relationships with them. If a small voice inside you warns you, listen to the warning.

Celebrate Small Steps

Thursday, February 7th, 2013

Celebrate and focus on the small steps you take each day as you move forward. Minimize the setbacks.

Resources for Survivors

Monday, January 21st, 2013

Abuse Survivors

Author: Dr Jeanne King PhD

Domestic Violence Help – The 5 Essential Resources for Domestic Abuse Survivors

Domestic violence help comes in all shapes and sizes. There is 
the crisis hot line to get you where you need to go ASAP. Then, 
there are the community domestic abuse support groups that
 assure you that “you are not alone.”

Your domestic violence shelter will give you all the resources 
for your immediate transition from the danger you live to safe 
housing. They may even have a domestic abuse legal advocate that 
will help you with your legal matters.

But what about your psychological care, who will tend to that?
 You can find a counselor or therapist with clinical background 
in domestic violence. Sometimes you may scratch your head 
wondering if you know more about domestic abuse than the 
therapist. Other times, you can hit the jackpot and find the
 professional health care provider that helps you usher yourself 
out of the darkness into the light.

Do you know the help you will want to secure in your quest to 
end domestic abuse? Do you know where you will find each piece
of the puzzle as you transition from being in an abusive
 relationship to reclaiming yourself and your life?

Far too often domestic violence survivors don’t really know what
 they need or where to find it when they need it most. The more 
homework you do up front, the better off you will be in the long run.

The following is intended to help you inventory your needs and
 prioritize your securing help in meeting these needs.

  1. Create an alliance with your local public abuse services for 
all immediate needs and steps to protect yourself from imminent
 danger.
  2. Familiarize yourself with your residential options before you 
jump out of the “nest.”
  3. Compile your personal documents and get your finances in 
order as best as can be done, even though you may not be
 accustomed to finance management.
  4. Secure information and resources to help you obtain any
 protective orders you believe necessary to minimize conflict and 
danger by your abusive partner, especially upon and after your 
departure.
  5. Engage a healthcare provider that is knowledgeable about the
 psychological, social and legal aspects of domestic abuse to 
help your navigate from the chaos to closure.

As in any journey, once you get your ducks in a row and line up 
your resources and soldiers, you will move from point A to point
 B more successfully. Your planning is key to your designing your 
exit and the outcome of your departure.

About the author:

For more information and help in your planning, see domestic
violence resources. Dr. Jeanne King, Ph.D. helps people
 recognize, end and heal from domestic abuse at home and in
court.

Copyright 2009

http://www.PreventAbusiveRelationships.com/ebooks.php

Getting Burned & Life Lessons

Tuesday, December 4th, 2012

One time when my oldest son was two I was standing at the kitchen stove just starting dinner.  I turned the front burner on. My son came up to the stove and I told him “Hot don’t touch, it will hurt. No!”

He looked at me and said “Hot!”

I said “That’s right, hot!”

He looked at the burner then looked at me, looked at the burner, then looked at me again.  With no warning what-so-ever he firmly placed his hand right on it! In the same instant came his blood curdling scream and me picking him up. I dashed out of the kitchen him in my arms to take care of the burn repeating, “Hot, hot, I told you hot!”

Well, I may have told him hot but he didn’t understand hot until he felt hot on his hand! He definitely learned about hot after that incident. Fortunately the stove burner wasn’t on high or even medium heat but it was hot enough to burn his hand and as a result he never touched a stove burner again.

Lesson learned. Stove burners are hot. Place your hand on one and you’ll get burned.

For me, there have been situations in my life where it took more than one experience to learn a lesson. There have been times when despite red flags, warnings, and incidents where it was clear I needed to pay attention, I repeatedly didn’t learn.  Instead I wished and hoped and prayed things would work out.  I often ignored my gut instincts opting to second guess myself instead. So it went like this:

Lesson not learned. Repeat lesson.

Lesson not learned. Repeat lesson again…

I would rather confidently say, I know what is best for me

than after the fact say…

I was afraid that would happen!

Or

I’m not comfortable with that

rather than…

Oh, I guess it will be okay.

When we think about what we want, we really do know.

And if we really are unsure in a given situation then what we’re really saying is no.

How many times does it take to learn one life lesson?

As many times as we allow it to take.

There are some lessons we don’t want to repeat more than once because these lessons take a toll on us.

So the next time you come into contact with a hot burner and you’ve already felt the pain pay attention to the voice that tells you to turn your back and walk away.

 

Leaving a Bad Relationship

Thursday, October 11th, 2012

Nearly eight years ago I walked away from a bad relationship. I had been warming up to the idea of leaving for about a year. I kept thinking of reasons to stay. I’d see a ray of hope and latch on clinging to it for days until the ray dimmed and the down cycle began again. I waited through each bad cycle hoping again for another glimmer to emerge. These cycles were my lot inside this particular relationship and it took me a long time to realize that all my hoping was doing nothing more than keeping me stuck. I had to get through enough of the up and down cycles until I “got it.” Eventually I understood that the relationship was nothing more than a series of very short good cycles and much longer bad ones.

It’s hard to give up hope when you care for someone. It is painful to face the reality of what is clearly a losing proposition. We all need hope in our lives; it keeps us going and encourages us to move forward yet we’ve all got to face that staying in a bad relationship is a waste of precious time. The relationship I had was never going to bring me anything different than what I’d already experienced–why in the world would I want that?

I knew it would be better for me to stop the cycles cut my losses and walk away. Yet what prevented me from leaving was my dread of facing the end. I didn’t look forward to the misery I was sure would follow; I didn’t want to experience the emptiness I was certain would be mine to come. Looking back, it’s like I stepped on a bee got stung wished later I’d been wearing shoes but continued to walk around barefoot.

So even though my immediate thought was to keep things status quo in order to avoid pain I knew that long term suffering would have been the outcome of staying.

With the breakup came wisdom, courage, and hope. This hope wasn’t misplaced; it was hard-won. I learned that any relationship is not better than no relationship. I also learned that healthy relationships require paying attention in all aspects of life. It’s not hard to make good relationship choices but it does take knowing what you will and won’t accept and sticking with it.

Reprogram Your Self Talk

Saturday, September 29th, 2012

It is very easy to allow yourself to believe that life will not get better and that you do not have what it takes to move forward successfully in relationships, career, or in any other way.

Being in destructive relationships includes the one you’re in with yourself. When you have been put down, badgered, belittled, ignored, or physically, emotionally, mentally, or sexually abused, it is easy to believe that you cannot do anything right or are not as good as others.

It is easy to think this way because at some point in your life or maybe throughout life you have listened to others who have told you that you are some how defective or are missing something and because of this will always  fail.

If whatever you believe, whatever recording you play over and over in your mind is negative, that noise can be deafening.  Silence the noise by playing a new recording–one that is positive uplifting and accurate. Memorize this recording and play it loud. Write it out and stick it to a wall where you will see it every day.

Start playing the new recording today. Play it over and over until you believe it. When the old negative recording starts to creep back into your thoughts focus on drowning it out with the new vibrant positive one.

Instead of being your own worst enemy concentrate on being your best friend.

Courage to say NO!

Monday, August 27th, 2012

We need to find the courage to say NO to the things and people that are not serving us if we want to rediscover ourselves and live our lives with authenticity.   Barbara De Angelis

You Might Love ‘Em but Do You Like ‘Em?

Wednesday, August 8th, 2012

Have you ever felt that although you feel love for your partner you really don’t like him or her?

You sure wouldn’t be alone.

It is not uncommon at times to dislike a partner–even a nice partner who treats you well. They could be having a bad day and/or are stressed or maybe both of you are out of sorts, that happens.  However if you’ve had or have a partner who is none too nice to begin with life can be hard on a regular basis.

Yesterday I went with my son to a local retail outlet to exchange an item. In front of us was another customer making a return. He tells the clerk he needs to exchange what he bought because his girlfriend’s idiot son broke it (fortunately neither the girlfriend or her son were with him.)

I immediately felt sorry for his girlfriend and her son. I wondered about this guy and how truly loving he could be to either of them. I thought well maybe she loves the guy but how easy is he to like?

There are things that eat away at people for sure but one of the hardest to take day in and out are the jabbing stabbing cruel things people say to those they are closest to. If this man referred to his gf’s child as an idiot to a stranger how would he address him at home?

A piggy bank comes to mind. When someone says something nice they deposit a coin. After enough coins get deposited and the bank is full they break it open and treat themselves. On the other hand, if cruel words are said a coin is taken out. If the cruel words outnumber the nice ones that bank isn’t going to fill up anytime soon.

How is it possible to like let alone love a person who is cruel to you, your children, your parents, siblings, friends, co-workers, or pets?  Words sting. You can pretend that words don’t hurt but deep down you”re not fooling anyone and especially not fooling yourself. Eventually love fades and is replaced by a ton of anger and resentment.

You don’t need it and neither do your loved ones.

So what do you do?

For starters you stop taking it.

Let the person know it’s not okay and you will no longer put up with it.

If it continues it’s up to you to decide if you can live another day or more the way you’re living now. Decide if it’s worth your health and that of your family.

As always, if you are in a violent relationship please seek the advice of a professional before making changes in your current situation.

National Domestic Violence Hotline  1-800-799-SAFE.

 

 

 

Cheaters

Monday, July 23rd, 2012

Cheaters are out there in full force. They may cheat out of desperation or feel they must cheat because not to takes too much time. Sometimes people cheat because they can’t help themselves. Whatever the reason, cheating will eventually catch up with them and when it does lives may be shattered and/or relationships broken beyond repair.

If you are involved with a cheater whether through business or in a personal relationship there is one of three ways you’ll discover the wrongdoing. They will either tell you to your face , you will discover it on your own, or someone else will step forward.

Once you know, your job is to decide what you are going to do about it.

For some the decision is easy–they get out. Maybe they’ve been suspicious for awhile and had enough time to process their decision.

Others are blindsided. They didn’t see it coming so aren’t immediately sure what their course of action will be. Only when they get their bearings do they decide what they will do.

Some people discover the cheating but choose to stay involved. This decision can be made because they choose to ignore the violation, feel they have too much invested emotionally and/or financially to leave or because they face the cheating head on and choose to work through the issues.

Whatever route you take one thing is for sure–cheating will change your life. Even when people choose to ignore cheating it takes energy to hold that violation deep inside. Don’t kid yourself, there won’t be too many days when you don’t wonder if and when it will happen again.

Next time:  You and the Cheater